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Restorations


Composite Restoration

Composite Restoration of toothA composite restoration is a tooth-colored plastic mixture filled with glass (silicon dioxide). Continuously, composites are being significantly improved. In fact, composites are not only used for restoring decay, but are also used for cosmetic improvements.


Dental Crowns

Dental Crown
Crowns are a type of dental restoration which, when cemented into place, fully cup over the portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line. In comparison, fillings are dental restorations that fill in or cover over just a portion of a tooth. Since dental crowns encase the entire visible aspect of a tooth, a dental crown in effect becomes the tooth’s new outer surface.

Crowns can be made out of porcelain, metal (a gold or other metal alloy), or a combination of both. Other terms that are used to refer to dental crowns are “dental caps” and “tooth caps.”

A dentist might recommend placing a dental crown for a variety of reasons but, in general, they are used to restore a tooth to it’s original shape, to strengthen a tooth, or to improve the cosmetic appearance of the tooth.


Dental Bridges

Dental BridgeA dental bridge is a false tooth or teeth, known as a pontic, which is fused between two porcelain crowns to fill in the area left by a missing tooth or teeth. The two crowns holding it in place that are attached onto your teeth on each side of the false tooth. This is known as a fixed bridge. This procedure is used to replace one or more missing teeth. Fixed bridges cannot be taken out of your mouth as you might do with removable partial dentures. Bridges are natural in appearance, and usually require only two visits to your dentist. If you maintain good oral hygiene, your fixed bridge should last as many as ten years or more.


Root Canal Therapy

Root canal treatmentRoot canal therapy refers to the process by which a dentist treats the inner aspects of a tooth, specifically that area inside a tooth that is occupied by its “pulp tissue.” Most people would probably refer to a tooth’s pulp tissue as its “nerve.” While a tooth’s pulp tissue does contain nerve fibers it is also composed of arteries, veins, lymph vessels, and connective tissue.